Performance of a New Point-of-care Rapid Test to Diagnose Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis

Observational
Infectious
RECRUITING

Overview

Help evaluate performance of a new point-of-care rapid test to diagnose pulmonary coccidioidomycosis

Complete the registration form to find out if your pet qualifies to be in our clinical trial.

Diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis in dogs is challenging due to the fact that the symptoms are not specific for this disease. Coccidioidomycosis can be diagnosed via a biopsy however the most common method is testing for antibodies to the fungus. These tests are often sent to third party labs delaying confirmation of the disease. This study looks to evaluate a potential point of care rapid test which would be able to provide a positive or negative result indicating the presence or absence of antibodies, respectively, within 30-60 minutes. The diagnosis of pulmonary coccidioidomycosis can be difficult because clinical signs overlap with many other respiratory tract disorders and dogs can have positive Valley Fever antibody titers without active clinical infection. Acute phase proteins are useful biomarkers for many other disorders and our hope is to determine whether they can facilitate making a diagnosis of pulmonary coccidioidomycosis in dogs. For additional details or questions please contact Dr. Jaffey (jjaffe@midwestern.edu).

Compensation

Free:

  • Coccidioides serologic testing

  • Repeat testing in 30 days if negative baseline results

  • Thoracic radiographs if performed at MWU

  • Repeat Valley Fever titer tests at 3 months

Participants will receive FREE Coccidioides serologic testing. If negative baseline results we can repeat testing in 30 days for FREE. We can perform thoracic radiographs for FREE if performed at MWU. We can also repeat VF titers for FREE at 3 months if needed.

We will pick up sample from your clinic and submit it through our lab.

Owner Responsibilities

All other costs associated with treatment or monitoring

All other costs associated with treatment or monitoring deemed necessary by attending clinician (e.g., recheck exams, x-rays, antifungals, other medicaions).

Participation

Samples we need:

  1. Point-of-care rapid test study: 4 mls of blood in serum separator tube. Let clot. Centrifuge so serum separates.

  2. Acute phase protein study: 3 mls of blood in serum separator tube. Let clot. Centrifuge so serum separates

Most dogs with pulmonary coccidioidomycosis will qualify for both of these studies. Ideally, they are enrolled in both studies, which would require a total of

7 mls of blood. If you are not able to enroll both, then PRIORITIZE THE POINT-OF-CARE STUDY (4 mls of blood).

If you intend to send testing out through your clinic so your clinic is compensated for the testing then you can pull extra blood in suspected cases. Alternatively, if you send blood out and results are positive, you can have the client come back for a blood draw for the study at your clinic or at MWU-CVM at no charge.

Location

Midwestern University

GLENDALE, AZ

Location

Midwestern University Companion Animal Clinic

5715 Utopia Rd,

Glendale, AZ 85308

Study Team

Jared Jaffey
Jared JaffeyD.V.M., M.S., DACVIM

Veterinary medicine is an ever-evolving field that requires those involved to stay current in order to optimize patient care. I am proud to be associated with Midwestern University, where I can help patients directly, help train future veterinarians, and contribute to research that can augment care of animals around the world.

Apply today if...

Your dog has a a confirmed or suspected novel diagnosis of pulmonary coccidioidomycosis

Your dog has a a confirmed or suspected novel diagnosis of pulmonary coccidioidomycosis

Your dog has at least 1 respiratory sign

Your dog has one of the following respiratory signs:

  • Cough

  • Exercise intolerance

  • Wheezing

  • Dyspnea

  • Tachypnea

  • Respiratory distress

Your dog has not received an anti-fungal treatment more than 7 days before enrollment

Dog must not have received an anti-fungal treatment for more than 7 days before enrollment

Background

In the environment, Coccidioides spp. are distributed in regions with arid soils, low elevations above sea level, and hot summers. Infections occur primarily in the southwestern United States, Mexico, and parts of Central and South America. In southwestern USA, highly endemic regions include the south-central valley of California (‘Valley Fever’) and Arizona. Latent infections occur in dogs and these can reactivate after treatment with immunosuppressive drugs.

Causes

Coccidioides spp. (Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii) are dimorphic fungi that exist in soil as chains of barrel-shaped arthrospores. The arthrospores are aerosolized and inhaled by animal hosts. This may be followed by localized pulmonary disease or dissemination to the tracheobronchial lymph nodes then other anatomic sites in the face of an inadequate immune response. Infections often follow a pattern of moist conditions (required for growth of Coccidioides spp. in the soil), a dry period, then soil disruption, such as may occur with heavy rainfall, dust storms, or construction.

Diagnosis

A diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis is typically confirmed using serology for antibodies to Coccidioides spp., because of the low sensitivity of cytology and the fact that culture is hazardous to laboratory personnel and can have a long turnaround time. Cytologic examination of specimens from affected tissues or body fluids reveals granulomatous or pyogranulomatous inflammation.

About Coccidioidomycosis

In the environment, Coccidioides spp. are distributed in regions with arid soils, low elevations above sea level, and hot summers. Infections occur primarily in the southwestern United States, Mexico, and parts of Central and South America. In southwestern USA, highly endemic regions include the south-central valley of California (‘Valley Fever’) and Arizona. Latent infections occur in dogs and these can reactivate after treatment with immunosuppressive drugs.

Coccidioides spp. (Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii) are dimorphic fungi that exist in soil as chains of barrel-shaped arthrospores. The arthrospores are aerosolized and inhaled by animal hosts. This may be followed by localized pulmonary disease or dissemination to the tracheobronchial lymph nodes then other anatomic sites in the face of an inadequate immune response. Infections often follow a pattern of moist conditions (required for growth of Coccidioides spp. in the soil), a dry period, then soil disruption, such as may occur with heavy rainfall, dust storms, or construction.

A diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis is typically confirmed using serology for antibodies to Coccidioides spp., because of the low sensitivity of cytology and the fact that culture is hazardous to laboratory personnel and can have a long turnaround time. Cytologic examination of specimens from affected tissues or body fluids reveals granulomatous or pyogranulomatous inflammation.

FAQs

Know before you register

What is a clinical trial?

Who should I contact with additional questions about the study?

What is a clinical trial?

Doctors and scientists take part in many kinds of research studies. Clinical research helps researchers understand how best to treat patients or helps them learn more about a particular condition or disease. There are many different forms of clinical research. One common form is a clinical trial. In a clinical trial, researchers test new drugs, medical devices or treatments.

Clinical trials may seek to discover new drugs, new ways of giving patients approved drugs, new combinations of approved drugs, new surgical techniques, devices, or biological products. Clinical trials are also conducted to test cutting-edge and novel therapies, like studies that involve gene therapy or gene transfer.

Who should I contact with additional questions about the study?

If you have additional questions about the study please reach out to Dr. Jaffey (jjaffe@midwestern.edu).